Department of Defense
High Performance Computing Modernization Program

This article provides information for those interested in benefitting from the experience of large organizations and academic institutions that have deployed dual-stack environments (which support both Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) and IPv6) across multiple geographic locations and on wide-area networks, as well as smaller organizations at a single geographic location. Lessons learned and in some cases descriptions of the processes actually used while deploying IPv6 may also be found in the Overview of Lessons Learned article in the General Information section.

Note: If you are just starting to think about deploying IPv6 or are still in the early planning stages of an IPv6 deployment, please review the Before you Begin article in the Deployment section.

A preliminaray step in the process of deploying IPv6 might be to enable IPv6 access for an existing public-facing IPv4-only web server using one of the services or products described in the Content and Applications Delivery over IPv6 article in the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section.

This Overview of Process article provides references to several discussions on the overall subject of deploying dual-stack environments in four major categories:

1. Large Organizations' Process. This category provides references to the project management, planning, and deployment processes used by organizations in three subcategories:

(A) United States (US) Federal government organizations,
(B) foreign government organizations, and
(C) large private corporations.

2. Academic Organizations' Process. This category provides references to the project management, planning, and deployment processes used by colleges and universities.

3. Smaller Organizations' Process. This category provides references to the project management, planning, and deployment processes used by organizations with a single geographic location.

4. DREN's Process. This category discusses the project management, planning, and deployment processes used by the US Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Research and Engineering Network (DREN) when it was a US DoD IPv6 Pilot network and an early adopter of IPv6.


1. Large Organizations' Process.

1.A US Federal Government Organizations

This presentation summarizes the evolution of the IPv6 deployment planning process in US Federal government organizations. The Federal IPv6 Task Force website provides extensive planning guidance and current events for Federal organizations. See this IPv6 Points of Contact article in the General Information section for the address of the Federal IPv6 Task Force website. The  US Federal Government Organizations IPv6 Deployment article in the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section provides additional information about Federal organizations' IPv6 deployment process.

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) plan for deploying IPv6 is summarized here, while the planning and deployment processes that were used earlier are described in their Government Empowering and Embracing the Kickoff of IPv6 (G.E.E.K.V.6) Invitation document and described in greater detail in slides 1-40 of their G.E.E.K.V.6 Day document. The management and planning process used by the Veterans Affairs (VA) within the Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) framework are summarized here and described in more detail in their IPv6 Transition Plan, Version 3.00.

Some of the documents created during US Federal organizations' IPv6 deployments include:

Created ByDocument Type
 American Council for Technology-Industry Advisory Council (ACT-IAC) IPv6 Working Group

 Agency IPv6 work breakout structure (WBS)

Energy Sciences Network

 top level IPv6 Implementation Checklist

Federal IPv6 Inter-Agency Working Group (IAWG)

 Agency IPv6 checklist

IAWG

 Agency IPv6 deployment timeline

 National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA)

 management checklist for dual-stack deployment (see Note 1 below)

 VA

 Impact Analysis

VA

 Network Address Plan (draft)

 VA

 Network Test Plan

VA, Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Social Security Administration (SSA)

 Network Test Results

VA

  Pilot Selection Process

Note 1: Before using the Readiness Tracking Template portion of that checklist, please read the accompanying Readiness Tool description and try to answer the 8 questions asked there.

1.B Foreign Government Organizations
Example Enterprise Transition Plans, describing how organizations in Canada, Europe, Asia, Australia and other countries planned to deploy IPv6 are available in Part 3 of the IPv6 Policy and Guidance article in the General Information section. That article also provides additional official policy and unofficial guidance documents for US Federal government organizations. A broad overview of the enterprise-level deployment process used by the Australian IPv6 for e-Business Project to deploy IPv6 is available here.

1.C Large Private Corporations
The deployment and application migration processes that were used by Bechtel are described here and at greater length here (used with permission). The planning and deployment processes that were used by Cisco are described in this paper. The planning and deployment processes that were used by Google are described in this presentation and paper.


2. Academic Organizations' Process.

This category provides references to the project management, planning, and deployment processes used by colleges and universities.

Although somewhat dated (it was originally presented in 2004), the paper IPv6: A campus experience describing IPv6 deployment at the University of Southhampton, Highfield, Southhampton, UK, contains some useful checklists. A more recent campus IPv6 deployment at the Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, describes their process for Implementing IPv6 in an Organization. A white paper Transitioning to IPv6 by the EDUCAUSE Center For Analysis and Research describes the process followed by several Internet2 campuses.


3. Smaller Organizations' Process.

This category provides references to the management, planning, and deployment processes used by smaller organizations with a single geographic location.

The planning and deployment processes used on an Army installation are described in this paper. The Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) provides some useful details of their IPv6 deployment process here. The process used by the Ars Technica web content provider to deploy IPv6 is typical of small businesses, as described in this paper. An example of a simple deployment process for a smaller business is provided by this article. A more detailed deployment process is described by the Enabling IPv6 in Microsoft Windows Environment article in the Infrastructure section. A very simple deployment process for the home and Small Office/Home Office (SOHO) user is described by the IPv6 in the Home and Small Office/Home Office (SOHO) article in the Deployment section.


4. DREN's Process.

The documents described in the Introduction and Implementation Details subcatefories below were originally used as part of the enclave-level planning and deployment process in 2003-2004. They were revised in 2009.

4.1 Introduction. These General Introduction and DREN Pilot Introduction articles provide a limited amount of historical perspective on DoD and other US Federal government organizations' efforts to deploy IPv6, together with a high level description of the DREN IPv6 Pilot deployment planning process.

4.2 Implementation Details: A top-level description of a plan based on the Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU) Software Engineering Institute (SEITransPlant technology transition methodology is described here. This is a description of a plan for the enclave-level engineering process based on TransPlant used to develop an IPv6 deployment plan. This is one example of such an enclave-level IPv6 deployment plan. References to additional CMU SEI TransPlant documents are given in the top-level and enclave-level DREN documents.

 


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