Department of Defense
High Performance Computing Modernization Program

Before you ask for Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) addresses, you need to have some idea of how many to ask for. If you have not already done so, please review the Basic Information topic in the IPv6 Address Plans article in the Network Management section.

Where you get IPv6 addresses from depends on the size and nature of your organization and whether you already have some IPv6 addresses.

If you are getting IPv6 addresses for your home, for a Small Office/Home Office (SOHO), or for a Small-Medium Business (SMB) with only one Internet connection point, then

  1. If your current Internet Service Provider (ISP) is listed in Available IPv6 Internet Service and Transit Providers in the Frequently Asked Questionis (FAQ) section, contact them to see if they can provide you with IPv6 addresses and IPv6 Internet connectivity!
  2. Otherwise, you will probably need to get Provider-Aggregatable (PA) IPv6 addresses from a new ISP after confirming that your current ISP is unable to provide IPv6 service to your location. Review this article for additional background information and this article as well as this article for some questions to ask any potential ISP.

If you are getting IPv6 addresses for a large enterprise with multiple locations served by multiple ISPs, if your organization has its own Autonomous System Number (ASN), or if your organization has previously gotten IPv4 addresses directly from a Regional Internet Registry (RIR), then you will probably want to review this IPv6 Address Allocation and Assignment Policy document and then evaluate both:

  1. Getting Provider-Independent (PI) IPv6 addresses directly from one of the five RIRs. The RIR for North America is the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), and their procedures are documented here
  2. Getting PA IPv6 addresses from each of your current ISPs or others if some of your current ISPs are unable to provide IPv6 service to some of your connection point(s).  Review this article for additional background information and this article as well as this article for some questions to ask any potential ISP.

If you are part of the United States (US) Department of Defense (DoD), you will probably obtain IPv6 addresses in accordance with the DoD IPv6 Address Plan. Both the Address Plan and addresses can be obtained from the DoD Network Information Center (NIC) (Authentication Required). (The DoD NIC only issues addresses to those in the ".mil" domain.)

If you are part of some other Federal government organization, you will probably get IPv6 addresses from the office of your organization’s Chief Information Officer (CIO). If that office can’t help you, chances are you shouldn’t be using IPv6 addresses even if you can get them.

If you are part of one of the few State governments in the US that are deploying or are planning to deploy IPv6 (Oregon - on hold since 2015, Virginia, Washington, or Wyoming), then you will get your IPv6 addresses from your State CIO. The reasons so few State governments are deploying or are planning to deploy IPv6 are given in this 2016 letter from the National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO).

If you are part of some educational institution, the office of your institution’s CIO (who is not the Chief Instructional Officer) will probably either provide the IPv6 addresses or instructions on how to request them. As is the case with government organizations, if that office can’t help you, chances are you shouldn’t be using IPv6 addresses even if you can get them. 

If you already have some IPv6 addresses and you want different addresses, you face another set of challenges, as described by this article on the Headaches of IPv6 readdressing.


Top